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What's new!


June 2017

Our newest paper "A highly specific phage defense system is a conserved feature of the Vibrio cholerae mobilome" has been published in PLOS Genetics! Congrats to Brendan, Zach and Amelia! 

We are excited to welcome our new postdoc Steph Hays to the lab! 

May 2017

Our paper "Functional Analysis of Bacteriophage Immunity through a Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System in Vibrio cholerae and Its Application in Bacteriophage Genome Engineering" was awarded the Nestlé Phage Award of the American Society for Microbiology! Thank you to Division M and the American Society for Microbiology for this award, congrats to former lab members Allison Box, Matt McGuffie and Brendan O'Hara!

April 2017

Kristen Legault has joined the lab! Kristen is in the Microbiology PhD program and was also recently awarded an NSF Fellowship! 

Congratulations to Amelia and Zach: They both passed their qualifying exams at Berkeley!

February 2017

Kim was named a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigator! 

January 2017

Undergraduate researcher Maria Nguyen has joined the lab!

September 2016

The lab has been awarded an R01 grant by NIAID!

 

Current Openings

We are always seeking bright and energetic additions to our lab.  If you are interested, Please email Dr. Seed a cover letter describing your research interests and qualifications, your CV and contact information for three references.

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What's new!


June 2017

Our newest paper "A highly specific phage defense system is a conserved feature of the Vibrio cholerae mobilome" has been published in PLOS Genetics! Congrats to Brendan, Zach and Amelia! 

We are excited to welcome our new postdoc Steph Hays to the lab! 

May 2017

Our paper "Functional Analysis of Bacteriophage Immunity through a Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System in Vibrio cholerae and Its Application in Bacteriophage Genome Engineering" was awarded the Nestlé Phage Award of the American Society for Microbiology! Thank you to Division M and the American Society for Microbiology for this award, congrats to former lab members Allison Box, Matt McGuffie and Brendan O'Hara!

April 2017

Kristen Legault has joined the lab! Kristen is in the Microbiology PhD program and was also recently awarded an NSF Fellowship! 

Congratulations to Amelia and Zach: They both passed their qualifying exams at Berkeley!

February 2017

Kim was named a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigator! 

January 2017

Undergraduate researcher Maria Nguyen has joined the lab!

September 2016

The lab has been awarded an R01 grant by NIAID!

 

Current Openings

We are always seeking bright and energetic additions to our lab.  If you are interested, Please email Dr. Seed a cover letter describing your research interests and qualifications, your CV and contact information for three references.

The Seed Lab

Our research centers on the interactions between bacteria and their viral predators (bacteriophages), and how these interactions impact human health and disease.

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What are Phage?


Phages are viruses that specifically infect bacteria and they are found wherever bacteria reside. Like all viruses, phages are obligate intracellular parasites: they are metabolically inert in their extracellular form and they need to hijack a bacterial host in order to replicate. Phages employ diverse strategies to exploit bacteria for their own replication, phages can attack and kill a target bacterium within minutes of infection, or they can establish long-term symbiotic relationships with their bacterial hosts. The interactions between bacteria and phages are central to the evolution of microbial communities, including those that contribute to our health (the microbiome) and those that cause disease.

What are Phage?


Phages are viruses that specifically infect bacteria and they are found wherever bacteria reside. Like all viruses, phages are obligate intracellular parasites: they are metabolically inert in their extracellular form and they need to hijack a bacterial host in order to replicate. Phages employ diverse strategies to exploit bacteria for their own replication, phages can attack and kill a target bacterium within minutes of infection, or they can establish long-term symbiotic relationships with their bacterial hosts. The interactions between bacteria and phages are central to the evolution of microbial communities, including those that contribute to our health (the microbiome) and those that cause disease.

 

Our lab investigates the impact of phages on the evolution and epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae, which is the causative agent of the severe diarrheal disease cholera. As a waterborne disease, cholera is a serious threat in areas of the world where sanitation is poor and access to safe drinking water is limited. Cholera is endemic in over 50 countries and also causes devastating epidemics; alarmingly, the incidence of cholera is steadily increasing and the global disease burden is currently estimated to be 3-5 million cases annually. 

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Our focus


Phages that specifically infect and kill V. cholerae are thought to modulate the inter-epidemic persistence of V. cholerae in the environment, thus impacting the occurrence and severity of outbreaks; however, uniquely, these phages also travel with V. cholerae into the human host and continue to prey on their bacterial host during infection. Therefore, phages have the unique potential to impact all aspects of the V. cholerae life cycle (including environmental persistence, infectivity and dissemination), on both a short and long-term evolutionary scale.

Our focus


Phages that specifically infect and kill V. cholerae are thought to modulate the inter-epidemic persistence of V. cholerae in the environment, thus impacting the occurrence and severity of outbreaks; however, uniquely, these phages also travel with V. cholerae into the human host and continue to prey on their bacterial host during infection. Therefore, phages have the unique potential to impact all aspects of the V. cholerae life cycle (including environmental persistence, infectivity and dissemination), on both a short and long-term evolutionary scale.

Principal Investigator

Dr. Kimberley Seed, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Dr. Kimberley Seed, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Education and Training

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Molecular Biology & Microbiology, Tufts University School of Medicine

Ph.D. Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Alberta